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Los Cabos Magazine #43

R E A L E S T A T E about someone living near the ocean in México, what would the film set look like? That vision will become your goal. Particularly because we are selling in a country of vibrant colors, it’s important not to make the property too neutral, what has been described as “over-blanding.” I recall one house, a seven-bedroom beauty in Pedregal that had been “over-blanded” with all-white walls and almost no artwork. When you are looking at 10,000 square feet of white walls, it’s easy to start wiping 38 Los Cabos Magazine | Spring 2016 details out of your memory. After a long time with no offers, the sellers brought in a decorator who painted a number of accent walls in very bright Mexican shades of red, blue, yellow, and purple. The reaction from potential buyers was dramatic: They either loved it or hated it. But they did react to the house, and shortly after it was painted, the house was finally sold. Deciding on a home is not purely an intellectual exercise: Emotions play a key role, and color stimulates emotion. The whole purpose of staging is to make a property feel like home to the target audience, including the color selections and furniture. There are many colors other than white that are considered neutral, and here in México, bold accent colors are acceptable as long as they don’t overwhelm the potential buyer. Much of our inventory is “view property,” or homes with excellent vistas. In addition to not competing with that view, you want to arrange your furnishings to help draw the eye to it. Having a clear path to the patio or balcony will invite prospective buyers to imagine themselves there. Arrange furniture in a way that both makes sense and brings attention to the home’s key points. For example, chairs flanking a fireplace will naturally call it to a prospect’s attention. Particularly in very large houses, your agent will be leading the prospects and their agent; your agent will have a route planned that will start and stop at key points to let certain features register with the potential buyer. Your furniture arrangement should facilitate this route. A tidy home is generally perceived to be well maintained, yet we all know it’s not easy to keep some things neat. One example is the closet. An old stager’s trick is the strategic use of pillow cases. A simple pillow case can hide a multitude of sins, including the always messy fitted sheet. Simply put the sheets or other items in the pillow case, smooth out and stack seam side out on the shelf. In the kitchen, most small appliances should be stored out of sight. An exception to this rule would be a very high-end piece such as a KitchenAid mixer, which speaks to the quality in the home. Once the counters are clear, a large statement piece may be added; again the goal is an inviting tableau rather than a blank slate. This formula should be repeated in every room, as well as the garage and storage areas. Remember, the whole point of staging is to remove the seller from the property. That is critical when a tour is scheduled. The owners, their family, and their pets should be off premises when prospects are touring the house. In Los Cabos, we often name our houses after ourselves. You should change the name of your house for marketing purposes: No more Casa Sam unless you are Sammy Hagar. Before a high-end retailer puts a dress on the sales floor, it makes sure it is clean and pressed; staging is simply the same concept for homes. Big or small, they can all benefit from a little staging, and you benefit in better offers and a quicker sale. Y


Los Cabos Magazine #43
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